Kentucky Car Accident Fatality caused by Drunk Driver

On Sunday, February 5, 2012, Robert Kempf was driving on I-71 near the Watterson Expressway in Louisville, Kentucky when a fatal accident occurred. Based on a preliminary investigation, this tragic car accident could have been avoided.

Robert Kempf and his friend had been watching the Super Bowl that Sunday, visiting with friends, drinking some alcohol. Later that night, Mr. Kempf got in his 1995 white Corvette with his friend. Once on I-71, he started speeding and lost control of the vehicle. Investigators are unsure if he ran off the road and rolled the car or if the car rolled over until it left the road. Either way, his 49-year-old passenger was killed when the car rolled onto its roof. How Mr. Kempf survived the crash is a mystery.

What is not a mystery are the factors involved in this crash. First, Mr. Kempf was driving over the posted speed limit, which makes it more difficult to control a vehicle. Second, Mr. Kempf had been drinking prior to driving the vehicle. Being under the influence of drugs or alcohol seriously hinders a driver’s ability to safely operate a vehicle. Apparently this was not the first time Mr. Kempf had driven while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. He has been charged with DUI at least three times in Louisville since the 1980s and had his license revoked at some point. He also faced drug-related charges in the past, which may mean some of his DUIs were drug-related instead of alcohol-related.

Unfortunately, this accident adds to the death toll on Kentucky roads that so far this year has exceeded 2011. According to Kentucky State Police, 64 people have died on the roads since the beginning of the year. This is an increase of five deaths over last year. Nine of the victims were killed in crashes caused by drunk drivers.


Sources:

Driver facing murder, DUI charges after I-71 crash; WHAS; Gene Kang; February 6, 2012

Driver Charged After Fatal I-71 Crash; WLKY; February 6, 2012

Kentucky Sees Increase In Fatal Crashes Over 2011; WLKY; February 10, 2012